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On the Legality of Cab Simulations
#1
While I couldn't find any black and white legislation under Singapore Statutes regarding the legality of simulating in-depth MRT systems, there's the Official Secrets Act.

Official Secrets Act excerpt:
5.—(1)  If any person having in his possession or control any secret official code word, countersign or password, or any photograph, drawing, plan, model, article, note, document or information which —
(a)
relates to or is used in a prohibited place or anything in such a place;

If the cab is designated as a prohibited place (which I think there's a high chance of it being so), this act would come into play. 

I know the common school of thought is that if we have flight simulators or overseas train simulators, why can't we have it too?

First, an understanding of the security climate in Singapore has to be made. This is not overseas where regulations are lax and security regulations aren't as comprehensive.

Second, how would you know other people's intentions? To you, it may just be a harmless train simulation but to people will ill intentions, its an avenue of getting insights into how our trains work and what systems are onboard. Always think a few steps deeper.

Third, I'm not the first one doing this. Do you just casually see a random video of Shinkansen cab rides floating around? The answer is a resounding no. Why? Security. It's the same idea. Even the Shinkansen simulators on the market have close to 0% systems simulation.

For CCL, the cab console is something that the public is able to see. Also, it only features a fairly basic simulation of overspeed protection and automatic driving capabilities. Not something that was done for the NSL.
- SMB142J -
사장,  SMB142J Studio Productions

openBVE Singapore North South Line and Rolling Stocks by SMB142J Studio Productions is licensed under Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International 
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#2
(27 January 2021, 03:06 PM)SMB142J Wrote:   Show/Hide

I don't think that overseas regulations are lax. If so, where are all the bad things that should happen because of the lax regulations? There aren't because you need more than just the knowledge by a simulator that's only showing a little part of all the things.

(27 January 2021, 03:06 PM)SMB142J Wrote:   Show/Hide

I understand your concerns, but in my opinion the problem are not the enthusiasts, but former employees who actually have a deep insight into the matter.

(27 January 2021, 03:06 PM)SMB142J Wrote:   Show/Hide

You're right. Often the right displays are blurred, but you'll also find some pictures of it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_MB3tZKafs 

So, what is it specifically about for the NSL? The CBTC display is no secret. The C151C were put into operation with a window on the back wall of the driver's cab and everyone could see how a train captain works. Even SMRT shows a lot in this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YWXzvEGSjao

Basically a train can only be driven if the interlocking allows it. Even in RM mode you can only go 18 km/h, which is slower than a bike (without wanting to play it down). What does not belong in a simulation are procedures in special situations and the deactivation of safety systems. But I think we always agreed on that point. If it's just about the realistic driving of a train, the risk is low. It takes more than just knowing how to drive a train. You need equipment, keys, ID cards and a deep insight... Before I became a train driver, I also played simulators (still today). So I'm aware of both sides.
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