Thread Rating:
  • 5 Vote(s) - 4 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Jurong Region Line (JRL) Discussion
(11 May 2018, 10:14 AM)TIB1000B Wrote:   Show/Hide

Most likely not, but they will use the conventional ones.

Here’s the quote from The Starits Times article: “A LTA spokesman added that an Light Rail Transit (LRT) system would have been unsuitable, as it is more adapted to straight line alignments, such as in airports.

The LRT system is "less effective in coping with sharp turns and undulating terrain in built-up areas", the LTA added.”

https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/t...n-built-up
[-] The following 1 user Likes C151 - 061/062's post:
  • AXOLOTL49
Reply
(11 May 2018, 10:14 AM)TIB1000B Wrote:   Show/Hide

(11 May 2018, 01:19 PM)Kitaro62 Wrote:   Show/Hide

For a fully elevated line that will run very close to existing HDB flats and landed houses and with JRL having sharp tight curves, it makes more sense to use rubber tyred trains similar to the Paris metro MP05 model, to reduce noise and navigate sharp tight turns.
MRT Train reps: 567/568, 669/670 7083/7084, 7085/7086 857, 863

Alstom is Love Alstom is Life  Big Grin
[-] The following 1 user Likes leonardtan's post:
  • TimothyE233
Reply
^ Agreed. Since JRL is going to be near residential buildings, it would be better to have least noise as possible. 

Rubber tyred train doesn't necessarily mean it's light rail. Sapporo Metro is one good example. It's a heavy capacity MRT line.
___________________________________________

今日も東京臨海高速鉄道りんかい線をご利用くださいまして、ありがとうございました。
Thank you for travelling on the Tokyo Rinkai Kaisoku Tetsudo Rinkai Line.


Reply
(11 May 2018, 01:19 PM)Kitaro62 Wrote:   Show/Hide

It should be using conventional tracks and metal wheels instead. The JRL is an MRT line after all. It ia a heavy capacity line and while it is elevated, it is using a three car system and probably not running on guideways like LRT but is using track viaducts. 
MRT and LRT is using different systems, and is based on daily ridership that LTA decided that it is a MRT line. Plus it is a medium capacity line and we have to consider the pressure the train tyres have to handle should it use tyres... overall they will most likely stick to metal wheels and traditional track viaducts albeit using ballested ones like the ones used on TWE.
[-] The following 1 user Likes AXOLOTL49's post:
  • smrtrainlovur
Reply
(12 May 2018, 08:55 PM)theodyssey132 Wrote:   Show/Hide
JRL is a Medium-Capacity Line, not Heavy Capacity Line. If you said JRL is an MRT line, look at Taipei Wenhu Line(which mentioned on previous post) which is MRT line, but it's medium capacity MRT line.
Quote:Plus it is a medium capacity line and we have to consider the pressure the train tyres have to handle should it use tyres... overall they will most likely stick to metal wheels and traditional track viaducts albeit using ballested ones like the ones used on TWE.
This nothing to do with tyres, looks at the situation for JRL, which runs mainly along residential area(which also mentioned on previous post), I won't be surprised if they using rubber tyred wheels.
Reply
There are MRTs out there overseas that use rubber tyred trains because the lines' alignments are very close to houses, have very sharp tight curves and steep slopes. Some of which are Taipei Wenhu Line (close to houses) and Paris Metro Line 6 (close to sensitive heritage buidlings) and Paris Metro Line 1 (sharp curves). 

JRL is basically the same as the above overseas examples that runs close to houses and features sharp turns. Rubber tyred trains are hence more practical and ideal.
MRT Train reps: 567/568, 669/670 7083/7084, 7085/7086 857, 863

Alstom is Love Alstom is Life  Big Grin
Reply
(12 May 2018, 09:50 PM)leonardtan Wrote:   Show/Hide

Yes. Actually another example is the Guangzhou Metro APM line. It uses rubber tyred trains (from bombardier - similar to Wenhu line in Taipei) but is considered a medium capacity metro line.
___________________________________________

今日も東京臨海高速鉄道りんかい線をご利用くださいまして、ありがとうございました。
Thank you for travelling on the Tokyo Rinkai Kaisoku Tetsudo Rinkai Line.


Reply
(11 May 2018, 01:19 PM)Kitaro62 Wrote:   Show/Hide

For those of you who said JRL might be a rubber-tyred system, isn't a rubber-tyred system no different from LRT which is "less effective in coping with sharp turns and undulating terrain in built-up areas" which has been deemed unsuitable for JRL?
Reply
(13 May 2018, 01:13 PM)smrtrainlovur Wrote:   Show/Hide

Please thoroughly read the comments above. Like I said, rubber tyred does not mean it's a light rail system. Sapporo Subway and Paris Metro for example.
___________________________________________

今日も東京臨海高速鉄道りんかい線をご利用くださいまして、ありがとうございました。
Thank you for travelling on the Tokyo Rinkai Kaisoku Tetsudo Rinkai Line.


Reply
(13 May 2018, 01:13 PM)smrtrainlovur Wrote:   Show/Hide

You misunderstood the quote. 

The reason why BPLRT type of rolling stock will not be used for JRL is because of the sharp turns. The APM trains are more suited for flat straight lines in airports. 

However, you also need to take into consideration where the line is running. Almost the entire line will run so close to HDB flats, condominiums, landed houses, there is certainly a need to reduce noise generated from the train wheel-track contact. 

Granted. Steel wheel trains can be used. Noise barriers can be built. Floating slab tracks can be built. But considering the sharp turns the trains need to navigate, the noise generated from these turns will still be ear piercing even with noise barriers and the sharp turns along the line will also reduce the steel wheels' effectiveness. 

Rubber tyred trains on the other hand, solves all the problems that steel wheel trains will face. Literally. 

I will advise that you look up on Paris Metro Line 6. It is a heavy capacity line that has elevated sections that runs past historical buildings and houses such that in the 1950s/60s, the Paris metro company RATP converted it to rubber tyre system to reduce noise and vibrations and the trains are the same size as our NSEWL/NEL carriage, with 4 doors per side per car (will become 3 per side per car when the MP89 replaces the existing MP73). In Paris also, Line 1 is using rubber tyred trains because it encounters sharp turns which are not favourable to steel wheel trains. 

Rubber tyred trains are also advantageous because of their faster acceleration and ability to brake at shorter distances, something which is present in the JRL's alignment and station spacing. 

Hence and otherwise, rubber tyre trains similar in size as those used in Paris Metro will be the most practical and ideal for our JRL.
MRT Train reps: 567/568, 669/670 7083/7084, 7085/7086 857, 863

Alstom is Love Alstom is Life  Big Grin
[-] The following 1 user Likes leonardtan's post:
  • TimothyE233
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  North East Line (NEL) Discussion tranzort08 458 581,565 18 August 2019, 02:50 PM
Last Post: metr0p0litain
  North South East West Lines (NSEWL) Discussion nakanoben 3,394 1,702,392 29 July 2019, 02:20 PM
Last Post: A380Lover
  Cross Island Line (CRL) / North Shore Line Discussion nakanoben 336 276,574 28 July 2019, 12:04 AM
Last Post: xDayTx_00
  Circle Line (CCL) Discussion WarGreymon X 1,768 1,463,607 27 July 2019, 11:42 PM
Last Post: xDayTx_00
  Discussion on Alstom C851E - Trains for Circle Line Stage 6/North East Line Extension nakanoben 17 20,216 25 July 2019, 11:51 AM
Last Post: A380Lover
  Changi Airport Skytrain Discussion nakanoben 110 135,504 02 July 2019, 07:46 PM
Last Post: AXOLOTL49
  Discussion on CJ151 - Trains for Jurong Region Line Flip 3 20,028 13 June 2019, 03:38 PM
Last Post: A380Lover
  Sentosa Express Discussion Scania96-101/102 137 136,272 02 April 2019, 09:45 PM
Last Post: Fairprice
  Discussion on CR151 - Replacement Trains for North-South / East-West Lines nakanoben 69 32,247 01 April 2019, 05:29 AM
Last Post: A380Lover
  Bukit Panjang LRT (BPLRT) & Sengkang-Punggol LRT (SPLRT) Discussion nakanoben 652 610,315 11 March 2019, 01:34 AM
Last Post: mauvd2000

Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)